• ENFORCEMENT • Dagwaagin (fall) is a time for the Ojibwe people to harvest manoomin (wild rice) and to hunt for waawaashkeshi (deer). When the Ojibwe lived off of the land, it was also a time to prepare everything for winter. Children often helped with activities such as processing rice, drying meat, and gathering fire wood. But it wasn’t all work. Fall was also a time to play games like lacrosse and the moccasin game. This past fall, Bad River and Mole Lake Bands of Chippewa hosted fall camps aimed at keeping these seasonal traditions alive. On October 27-28, Bad River’s camp got underway despite a nasty rainstorm that forced activities from the outdoor lodge constructed for camp to the community center. Under a nice dry roof, participants learned how to clean a deer, brain tan a deer hide, can venison, make apple cider, and play the moccasin game. Rela- tives from nearby Waaswaaganing (Lac du Flambeau) and Nagaajiwanaang (Fond du Lac) joined the Bad River community to teach, share, and spend time with all who attended. —P. Maday Dagwaagin-gabeshiwin Camp participants of the Sokaogon Mole Lake fall camp learn how to set up water sets for trapping. (K. McGeshick photo) Jarrold Ojibwe, (from the left) David Sam, Bazile Panek and Damon Panek help teach moccasin games at the Bad River dagwaagin gabeshiwin. (P. Maday photo) Following a second stint work- ing as a conservation officer in the Wisconsin Ceded Territory, Tom Kroeplin says he’s retired for good after turning in his GLIFWC badge, GL91, last October. Kroeplin joined the GLIFWC EnforcementDivisioninMarch2011 as its inaugural training director. Charged with developing compre- hensive programs for GLIFWC’s 20 officers spread across three states, he provided leadership to both new recruits and seasoned personnel. Kroeplin created annual train- ing sessions in the field as well as in-house activities to review ethics and legal authority. He also served as a liaison for the division with other law enforcement agencies. His conservation enforcement career first began with the Department of Natural Resources. As a state warden Kroeplin worked alongside a mix of interagency officers at Ceded Territory boatlandings in the 1980s during the early years of off-reservation spearfishing seasons. A fair-minded presence during sometimes chaotic nights along the lakeshore, Kroeplin earned the respect of tribal members for his efforts. Enjoy your retirement, Tom! —CO Rasmussen Kroeplin retires from law enforcement Deer season brings annual crop of new hunters N ew hunters took to off- reservation woodlands across the Ceded Territory followingseveralroundsofhuntersafety educationclassesinnativecommunities. BothGLIFWCandtribalwardenstaught combined classes of Indian and non- native students from Minnesota across Upper Michigan to Bay Mills. GLIFWC officers alone certified 117 hunters that included both kids and adults. At some locations families took safety courses together, looking to start their own hunting traditions while har- vesting healthy food for home-cooked meals. At the request of the Lac Courte Oreilles Tribal Governing Board, GLIFWC wardens added a second hunter safety class at the LCO Boys & Girls Club in November. It was first time area wardens offered a combina- tion online class with a mandatory field day. Students completed the lecture portion of the class online, reporting that it took roughly 10 hours. The field day consisted of safe firearm handling, tree-stand safety, a regulation question- and-answer session, and other hands-on skills, before students took the written and practical exams. “I’ve been teaching hunter educa- tionforsixyearsandthisisthefirstclass in which every student scored 100% on both the written and practical test,” said OfficerLaurenTuoriwhotaughttheclass with fellow GLIFWC wardens Mike PopovichandHollyBerkstresser.“Iwas impressedatthatlevelofproficiencythe studentsgainedthroughtheonlinecourse and a single day of hands-on practice.” A total of six students were certified. Look for future offerings from GLIFWC for internet hunter safety classes with a field day. For more infor- mation contact your local GLIFWC warden. —CO Rasmussen An adult hunter safety education student takes aim at a target while a Red Cliff conservation officer looks on. Safety courses for new hunters typically involve both classroom exercises and time in the field to become familiar with weapons, tree stands, and learning how to safely cross a fence. Individuals enrolled in GLIFWC member tribes are required to successfully complete a hunter education and firearm safety course before hunting off-reservation if they were born on or after January 1, 1977. Check with your local GLIFWC conservation wardens for exceptions including mentor hunting, and comple- tion of basic training in the US Armed Forces, Reserves, or National Guard. (CO Rasmussen photo) MAZINA’IGAN PAGE 10 WINTER 2017/2018