• ENFORCEMENT • Health emergency brings out the best By Dylan Jennings, Staff Writer Niibin (summer) often brings joy and laughter while youth andadultstaketotheoutdoors.ManykidsintheareaattendCamp Onji-Akiing at the US Forest Service’s Camp Nesbit property in Upper Michigan. This year, as youth explored the waters, com- pleted the high ropes course, and constructed their own ricing sticks, a camp emergency was the last thing on anyone’s mind. Camp participant Jasmine Brunette visited the nurse’s sta- tion for what looked like a skin rash. The camp nurse treated her symptoms and began to monitor Jasmine over the next few hours.Rashesandupsetstomachsarecommonsymptomsamong youth,howeverthiswastheone-in-a-thousandexception.Jasmine stumbled and passed out unconscious in front of a camp building and began to go into anaphylactic shock. Caught off guard, the crew rushed to Jasmine and didn’t waste a second. GLIFWC Warden Adam McGeshick checked her vitals while camp nurse Amanda Lambert pulled Jasmine’s health sheet. Joe Panci of the Forest Service called 911 numer- ous times to assure an ambulance was in route, while Camp CounselorMarandaMaulsondistractedtheotheryouththatwere beginning to rush to the scene, and continued activities so that nobody would panic. GLIFWCWardensMattKniskernandStevenAmslerloaded Jasmineintoavehicleandracedtomeettherescuesquad.Anyone that has been to Camp Onji-Akiing knows that it’s not a great place for cell reception. In fact, the dirt roads that lead towards the camp make it feel even more off the grid. “Every one of us had a part to play in this successful outcome. Teamwork was everything and is truly is something to be proud of,” recalled McGeshick. At the annual Forest Service MOU meeting in Mole Lake, Nikki Crowe, a grateful auntie of Jasmine and the 13 Moons Program Coordinator for Fond du Lac Tribal College, held an honoring for the wardens and others involved with the rescue mission. “I told myself I wasn’t going to be emotional, but it’s hard when you talk about potentially losing your babies. Nothing I can ever do will repay you guys for what you did,” she recounted. The wardens were wrapped in beautiful blankets and given bundles of medi- cine and manoomin. An honor song was rendered and Forest Service staff along with tribal leaders lined up to shake hands with the guys. “It was quite an ordeal to see my niece going through this, and a helpless feeling not knowing what to do for her,” Crowe said. “Miigwech to these guys and the GLIFWC staff for all their care and compassion towards the youth at Onji-Akiing Camp.” Safety is always a huge component in every GLIFWC course taught by staff. Thisteachablemomentreaffirmedtheimportanceofteamwork,safetyclasses,and the need for harvesters and community members to always be prepared, because somebody’s life may just depend on it. GLIFWC would like to commend every individual involved with the emer- gency, from Forest Service staff to the ambulance involved. Miigwech for helping save one of our campers! GLIFWC wardens and others were honored at the annual Forest Service MOU meeting in Mole Lake for helping save the life of a camper at Camp Onji-Akiing this past summer. Pictured, from the left, James Zorn, GLIFWC executive administrator; Nikki Crowe, 13 Moons program coordinator for Fond du Lac Tribal College; Steve Amsler, GLIFWC warden; Matt Kniskern, GLIFWC Warden; Jasmine Brunette, Onji-Akiing camper; and Adam McGeshick, GLIFWC warden. (D. Jennings photo) A look back at Onji-Akiing GLIFWC law enforcement staff Heather Bliss and Kim Campy net- workedwithothergroupsthatpromotenativeyouthandcultureatthePowerof WeconventioninDenver,ColoradolastSeptember.Thetwo-dayeventbrought together First Nations Development Institute grant recipients from across the country to learn about outreach strategies and fundraising opportunities. Surrounded by their plant and animal rela- tives, tribal youth gathered deep in the heart of the Ottawa National Forest for the 9th annual Onji-Akiing: From the Earth Cultural Youth Camp last summer. “We, as Lake Superior Ojibwe kids, feel at home here in the woods with all our relatives, human and non. We learn important things from them,” said Saagi Stark, Bad River member, junior camp counselor. Fifty-five campers and nine Junior Coun- selors celebrated their indigenous heritage with adventure-based learning activities that connect totheMedicineWheel,inwhichmental,physical, emotional, and spiritual aspects are explored. Notonlydidkidsexperiencecanoeing,fish- ing, archery, swimming and the team-building low ropes course, they also got to step into the shoes of several natural resources professionals that traveled from far places to share their cultural, col- legiate, and outdoor knowledge. Building upon the philosophy, “water is life,” camp centered around water activities. Campers worked with US Forest Service (USFS) staff to test water quality in Lake Nesbit. Campers also examined water-based plants around the lake and in the bog. Natassia, a visiting botanist from Belarus, intro- duced campers to a plant that serves as a bio-indicator forcleanwater.Natassiatoldthekidsthatinherculture, thisplantisextremelyrareandcelebratedwhenfound. Alsothisyear,studentshadthepleasureoflearning the cultural and the sustainable importance of decoy carvingwithculturalspeakeranddecoymaker,Brooks BigJohn of Lac du Flambeau. Each student brought a perch decoy home that they painted and will hopefullyuseforthewintericespearingseason. For the service project this year, campers painted and placed recycling bins around the camp, making recycling accessible to all the areas of camp for the first time ever. Campers were allowed to get creative and personal with the tops of the cans, bringing a sense of fun and excitement to recycling. GLIFWC, USFS, US Fish & Wildlife Service, and Michigan Department of Natural Resourcesstaffalsoreinforcedenvironmental stewardship to Mother Earth through hands- on activities, and held a Natural Resource CareerFairthatofferedpersonalexperienceto working, playing and caring for the outdoors. This fair included several colleges and tribal professionals from around the Great Lakes region. This camp is designed to empower the lives and strengthen the paths of Native Americanyouthtodaythroughculturalactivi- ties and wisdom. Onji-Akiing works to provide the tools that youth need in order to enrich their lives, their culture, and the communities they live in. If you are interested in information on the 2018 Onji-Akiing Camp Program (scheduled July 16-20), please contact HeatherBliss,outreachofficerathnaigus@glifwc.org. Also, please find more information at www.facebook. com/Full-Circle-Project-178794532131794/. Brooks BigJohn, Lac du Flambeau, instructed campers on the cultural and sustainable importance of decoy carving. Each camp- er constructed their own decoy to use this winter. (H. Bliss photo) By Heather Bliss GLIFWC Warden First Nations Development Institute Conference PAGE 11 MAZINA’IGAN WINTER 2017/2018