• PIPELINES/DEER REGISTRATION/RETIREMENT • On the cover Ojibwemowin on the go. Join Amik and tap into GLIFWC language resources including audio and interactive website activities at www.glifwc-inwe.com. Learn more on page 23. (Wesley Ballinger graphic) By Esteban Chiriboga, GLIFWC GIS Specialist The Minnesota Department of Commerce recently completed the Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for the Line 3 replacement project that Enbridge Energy is seeking to build.This new pipeline would replace the aging Line 3 pipeline and would continue transporting light crude oil from the Bakken oil fields in North Dakota to the oil terminal in Superior, Wisconsin (see map). GLIFWC, along with many tribes, submitted comments and provided information throughout the development of the document. The FEIS contains a chapter focused on the tribes, and how they may be impacted due to changes in the environment and natural resources; however, in its comments to the Department of Commerce on the FEIS, GLIFWC noted that these impacts do not factor into the overall conclusions and recommendations in a meaningful way. Environmental risks are considerable The FEIS developed environmental impact information for a number of proposed pipeline routes and compared them to determine the route with the least impact (“preferred route”). The tribes’ noted that the FEIS did not consider routes outside of the tribes’ Ceded Ter- ritories within areas already impacted by more intensive infrastructure development. All of the routes considered in the EIS travel within, or nearby, wild rice lakes. Thepreferredroutewouldimpactover675acresofwildricelakes, including 181 acres of lakes with documented wild rice harvest. This route would also impact over 5,700 acres of sensitive ecological areas, 618 domestic water wells and 20 public water supply wells. If permitted, the pipeline would cross 174 streams, over 5,600 acres of wildlife habitat and would lead to increased habi- tat fragmentation. Impacts to wetlands were not fully examined because detailed wetland delineations were not performed during the EIS process. The need for the pipeline is questionable To support its analysis, the Minnesota Department of Commerce hired an independentenergyconsultanttoconductananalysisoftheoilmarket.Thepurpose of the analysis was to establish the need for the pipeline given that there are many other pipelines currently transporting oil throughout the region. The overall conclusion was that Enbridge has not established a need for the pipeline. Establishing this need is required under state law. The reports indicate that the economic benefits of the new pipeline would mostly occur outside the state, and the Ceded Territories, while environmental and socioeconomic risks would remain in the state. Line 3 Replacement Project in MN Figure from the FEIS showing the location of the existing Line 3, and the preferred route for the replacement pipeline. The dagawaagin (fall) hunting season has been quite productive for waawaashkeshi (deer) hunters and below average for makwa (bear) hunters in the Ceded Territories. From the start of the season (the day after Labor Day) through December 1, Ojibwe hunters registered 1,655 deer and 23 black bears. At the same time last year, tribal members had registered 1,448 deer and 48 black bears. This is the first year tribal hunters have had the option of registering their deer remotely, via phone. Of the 1,655 deer registered so far, 357 (21%) of waawaashkeshiwag have been registered using the new phone registration system. Depending on the year, tribal hunters will generally have registered abouthalfofthenumberofoff-reservationdeerthatwillbetakenovertheentire hunting season by mid-November. The peak of the off-reservation tribal deer harvest typically falls over the second, third, and fourth weeks of November. —T. Bartnick Zorn to retire from GLIFWC All of the routes considered in the EIS travel within, or nearby, wild rice lakes. The pre- ferred route would impact over 675 acres of wild rice lakes. InalettertotheGLIFWCBoardofCommissionersOctober20,Execu- tive Administrator James E. Zorn announced his retirement effective May 21, 2018. The six-month interim provides time to complete a smooth and successful transition. “The depth of my gratitude for the opportunity to serve the Commis- sion for nearly 31 years is immeasurable,” Zorn wrote. “It is time for a new phase in my life that offers wonderful opportunities for me and my family.” GLIFWC has launched a search for Zorn’s successor. The Executive Administrator serves in key leadership and liaison roles regarding the co- management of Ceded Territory natural resources by GLIFWC’s tribes and with external federal, regional, state, local, and international agencies. For more see www.glifwc.org. Michigan orders repairs, safety improvements to Line 5 Amid mounting concerns about the structural safety of Line 5, Michigan officials called on Enbridge to take immediate steps to help ensure the envi- ronment is protected from potential spills. Constructed in 1953, the 645-mile Line 5 runs from Superior, Wisconsin to Sarnia, Ontario, transporting up to 540,000 barrels of crude oil daily. The line crosses vast areas of the 1836 and 1842 Ceded Territories where Ojibwe and Ottawa tribes hold off-reservation treaty rights to natural resources. Oil-transport company Enbridge recently entered into an agreement with the State of Michigan to address the state’s concerns regarding the line’s safety. According to the agreement, Enbridge is required to replace a portion of Line 5 that crosses underneath the St. Clair River and conduct a suite of studies to improve safety along the route, including the area of highest concern for regulators—the Straits of Mackinac, where the underwater pipeline runs across the lakebed at the intersection of Lakes Michigan and Huron. The state developed the list of requirements after discovering that Enbridge failed to reveal multiple deficiencies in the pipeline at the Straits, including washed away pipe supports and missing areas of protective coating on the line. Another Enbridge pipeline (Line 6B) dumped an historic 1.1 million gal- lons of oil into the Kalamazoo River system in 2010, devastating waterways and wetlands. The Canadian company spent more than $1 billion over four years in an effort to clean up the massive spill. Concerned about the age and condition of the line, the Bad River Tribe called for removal of Line 5 from reservation lands in far northern Wisconsin early in 2017. The line also carries natural gas liquids, which are refined into propane. —CO Rasmussen MAZINA’IGAN PAGE 2 WINTER 2017/2018