• RUNS/AWARD/WALKING ON • Ojibwe communities build strength, resilience through run/walks By Jason Schlender, For Mazina’igan Every step is a prayer. Drive up 10 and do 2. Prime rib sandwiches. Saunipi. EEEEYAAAAKEEE! If you are familiar with these words then you are familiar with the long-standing, powerful, and influential GLIFWC Healing Cirlcle Run/Walk (HCR). TheHCRwasinspiredbythePeace&SolidarityRuns,whichwere rooted in a dream by Ernie St. Germaine as a way to foster and promote peace and solidarity in a very tumultuous time—the spearfishing con- troversy of the 1980’s & 90’s. It was a time when many communities that neighbor tribal nations were openly opposed to the treaty rights exercised by Ojibwe people in northern Wisconsin. Since its beginning in 2001, the HCR has transformed into a movement of healing, pride, and cultural strength. Under the tutelage of Zaagijiweyiban (James Schlender Sr.) and Kiniw (Neil Kmiecik), those two men, with assistance from Agnes “Punkin” Fleming and Giiwegiizhigookwe Martin, were able to set forth a model of prayer, healing, bonding, and friendship that has now spread to other Ojibwe communities. In all of our communities we struggle with many social issues. Opiates, meth, heroin, and now fentynal have shown no mercy to our people in recent years. We still struggle with diabetes, smoking, and our longtime arch nemesis, alcohol. It seems so many negative things happen to our people that all hope is lost. Don’t be discouraged by all of that, though. One just needs to listen and learn from our great Uncle for he is our cultural hero. We rely on his teachings and miscues in our sacred aadizookaanan, and we apply those teachings to our lives and then we start to see gradual change for the better. Thesummerof2017culminatedwiththreeprominentactsofbravery,healing, and positivity in three different Ojibwe communities. In Odaawaa Zaaga’iganing there was the Maamiwichigewin Run/Walk which took place to promote unity and healing. Maamiwichigewin translates to unity or coming together. The 70-mile course covered every community on the reservation. The miles weren’t easy, but were softened by laughter, teasing, and dedication. A run through Lac Courte Oreilles wouldn’t be complete without the occasional incursion from a rez dog.We have to thank LCO Tribal Warden Aaron Debrot for warding off those persistent animoshag. T-shirts were made up with the slogan: “We run together, We Walk together, We are stronger together.” In Misi-Zaaga’iganing (Mille Lacs) the community constantly deals with the infiltration of harmful drugs. Some of the members of the community have started “Smudge Walks” as a way to promote sobriety, healing, and health. All walkers and runners are smudged before the run/walk begins and they start going around the community to promote healing and prayer. In Miskwaabekong (Red Cliff) the community held the Red Cliff Healing Walk. In addition to the drug epidemics that plague our communities this commu- nity wanted to also focus on their loved ones that are sick. The community came out together to promote healthy lifestyles and choices. The closeness of Red Cliff was on full display as elders walked with children and many people participated in this event. All of these community events were inspired by the GLIFWC Healing Circle Run/Walk.Themodelofconsistencypreachedbysuchgreatteachershasimpacted many more than we truly know.The power of asemaa, our music, and our language is evident by the testimony of the ones that have overcome addiction and have recovered from sickness. To the many people out there looking for some way out of the endless spiral of addiction and sickness join one of these healing run/ walks and you’ll see the difference in your life. Don’t be afraid to start something for your own community because you can’t go wrong when showing love and compassion for your people. Miigwech to Brad Harrington, Rosalie Gokee, and Carolyn Gouge for having faith in the model and the many people that have contributed miles and prayers along the way. Every step is a prayer. —Jason Schlender is Vice Chairman of the Lac Courte Oreilles Band The Mille Lacs Band (top) promotes sobriety healing, and health through community “Smudge Walks.” To the left: At Lac Courte Oreilles, a unified com- munity gathered together for the Maamiwichigewin Run/Walk. (J. Schlender photos) Dennis White receives UWS Distinguished Alumni Award Lac Courte Oreilles tribal member Dennis White was hon- ored with the University of Wis- consin-Superior Distinguished AlumniAwardSeptember21atthe YellowjacketUnion.Theawardis presented to an alumnus whose successservesasaninspirationfor current and prospective students. GLIFWC’s LaTisha Coffin, a UWS Alumni Association Board Member, also presented White withabeadedeaglefeatherduring the award presentation. A celebrated educator and administratorontheLCOreserva- tionformorethan30years,White is a world renowned fingerweav- ing and beadwork artist. Along with his wife Cleo, he has been a keyfigureinGLIFWC’slanguage and traditional food projects, as well as participating in GLIFWC’s GAAGIGE elder group. Comprised of elders from across the Ojibwe Ceded Territories, the GAAGIGE group advises GLIFWC staff on everything from traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) to natural resources management priorities. In 2016, the Wisconsin Indian EducationAssociation recognized White as IndianEducatoroftheYear.CoffinandfellowalumniboardmemberTomCulber nominated White for the recent UWS honor. White is a 1969 graduate of UWS. —CO Rasmussen L. Coffin photo Thomas Vennum dedicated much of his life to understanding American Indian culture and music, sharing his knowledge with people across the coun- try. The author, teacher, and ethnomusicologist walked on September 24 in Washburn, Wis. He was 82. In 1999Vennum was a featured speaker at GLIFWC’sWild Rice Research &ManagementConferenceattheFondduLacReservationinMinnesota.Con- ference organizer and current GLIFWC manoomin biologist Lisa David said Vennum’s 1988 book Wild Rice and the Ojibway People remains required reading for researchers. “For anyone doing work with manoomin, his wild rice book is an essential resource,” David said. Vennum also published scholarly research on lacrosse and native drums as well. AUSArmyveteran,VennumwentontobecomeSeniorEthnomusicologist in Folklife Programs at the Smithsonian Institute in Washington DC. He spent most summers on Madeline Island and built many friendships with Ojibwe people and others throughout the region. —CO Rasmussen Thomas Vennum a distinguished figure in Ojibwe Country ships. NICC currently is working on a model carbon sequestration ordinance for possible use by tribal governments. For tribal entities or individuals interested in learning more about car- bon sequestration projects, NICC holds regional training sessions including U.S.D.A. energy programs, regulatory permitting procedures, and landowner options. For information on NICC, go to www.indiancarbon.org/. Author’s note: The intent of this article is to provide general informa- tion on carbon credit. GLIFWC neither supports nor opposes carbon projects nor does it endorse any organization mentioned in this article. Carbon credits continued (continued from page 16) MAZINA’IGAN PAGE 22 WINTER 2017/2018