• GREAT LAKES/WINTER CAMP • Ishpaagoonikaa Deep Snow Cultural Camp Lac Courte Oreilles, Hayward, WI January 26-28, 2018 Ishpaagoonikaa seeks to increase knowledge and utilization of treaty rights in harvesting and protecting natural resources, encourage environmental stewardship, and promote natural resource careers. Additionally, the program strives to increase leadership skills in tribal youth, foster intergenerational learning opportunities between tribal elders and tribal youth, and focus on passing traditional Anishinaabe winter activity knowledge from generation to generation. This year’s Ishpaagoonikaa program will be held in Hayward, Wisconsin, on January 26-28, 2018, where GLIFWC’s Law Enforcement Division will partner with the Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians. Tribal youth will interact with elders, cultural knowledge sharers and GLIFWC staff in activities such as traditional tip-ups and ice spearing, sto- rytelling, small game trapping/snaring, animal processing, outdoor cooking, brain tanning, animal and track identification, winter shelter building, ishkode (fire) making, outdoor survival tactics, snow snake play, snowshoeing, cultural crafting, and moccasin games. This year will also feature an optional sweat lodge. This program seeks youth in grades 4-10. Older youth may apply to serve as mentors. Participants must spend both nights in the LCO school gym, 8575 N Trepania Road, Hayward, WI. The program will start on Friday at 6:00 pm CST and conclude Sunday at 1:00 pm. For more information, including an application to attend camp, please contact: Heather Bliss Patti Quaderer GLIFWC LE Outreach Officer LCO Trails Coordinator (906) 458-3778 (715) 558-7449 hnaigus@glifwc.org Patti.Quaderer@lco-nsn.gov Whitefish traditions, research span northern hemisphere 13th International Coregonid Symposium Bayfield, Wis.—Researchers from around the globe gathered in far northern Wisconsin September 10-15 to share insights about coregonids, a broad, silver- scaled fish that forms a centerpiece of some fresh and saltwater fisheries. Best known to anglers and restaurant diners as whitefish, in Lake Superior these also include cisco (lake herring), chubs (bloater, kiyi, shortjaw), and menominee (or round whitefish). While talk of bathometric profiles and spatial genetics permeated every corner the Bayfield Pavilion, certain plainspoken truths emerged from this inter- national gathering of scientists. Among them, whitefish are intimately linked to human communities across the northern hemisphere. From four-season northern hemisphere ports, generations of commercial fishermen continue to provide for extended families and keep fresh whitefish on the menu at local eateries. “In Puck Bay, there is a huge tradition, a family tradition, of fathers and sons that catch whitefish for many years,” said Ana Was, senior scientist at Poland’s National Marine Fisheries Research Institute. “It’s a big tourist area. They want to sell a high-quality product.” For folks acquainted with Great Lakes fishing towns, Poland’s Puck Bay region on the south Baltic Sea sounded pretty familiar—where regional economies are built around waterfront vacationlands that feature flavorful coregonid (kor- EE-go-nid) populations. The pattern is replicated in Ojibwe Country in places like Bayfield, Paradise, and Petoskey. For Ojibwe speakers, the fish is adikamageg. In the Polish language, it’s sieja. Both translations carry deeper meaning, of people and natural resources intertwined. More than 125 people from three continents attended the 13th International Coregonid Symposium. Sponsored by GLIFWC, Red Cliff Band, and eleven other organizations,theeventfeatured78speakersandthree-dozenposterpresenters—all gathered at the shore of Lake Superior. Echoing the cultural importance of whitefish to Great Lakes Indians, Scan- dinavian researchers shared stories that date back to the Middle Ages. Although the Tornionjoki River marks the border between Sweden and Finland, its whitefish resource unites villages on either bank. Local educators are working to preserve theculturalhistoryoftheareabyincorporatingfishingheritageintoschoolcurricu- lum. Oral histories with elder fishermen are also underway to document traditional fishing methods, food preparation, and to draft instructions on how to construct a krenkku—a wooden pier that provides access to whitefish dipnetting locations. For more visit the Symposium website www.coregonid2017.com —Bill Mattes contributed to this report. By Charlie Otto Rasmussen, Editor Flags from 13 nations, including Red Cliff Band, were displayed at the 13th International Coregonid Symposium where scientists shared whitefish research and talked about the unique place these fishes have in cultures around the northern hemisphere. (CO Rasmussen photo) GLIFWC researchers investigating role of splake on native fish populations By Bill Mattes, GLIFWC Great Lakes Biologist Upper Michigan—Last fall GLIFWC’s Great Lakes Section crew col- lected samples from splake and lake trout at the Copper Harbor spawning reef in Lake Superior. These samples are being analyzed to determine the genetic makeup of the fish to determine if splake are spawning successfully with lake trout at the reef. The genetic analysis will also verify the accuracy of species identification. Splake are a hybrid fish reared in hatcheries, spawned by crossing a male brook trout with a female lake trout. Splake exhibit hybrid vigor—they grow slightly faster than lake trout or brook trout, making them sought-after by sport fishers in harbors and bays around Lake Superior. Tribal fishers can keep them for subsistence use but currently cannot commercially harvest or sell the fish. Brook trout and lake trout typically do not hybridize in the wild. Brook trout spawn in streams, or very near shore reefs, over small gravel where they make redds (small indentations in the gravel). Lake trout spawn on reefs submerged by 15 to 50 feet of water over large cobble where fertilized eggs settle into the spaces between the rocks to grow and hatch. Splake,however,havebeenobservedinstreamswherebrooktroutarespawn- ing,aswellasonreefswherelaketroutarespawning.Theseobservationshighlight a potential risk associated with the practice of stocking splake in areas where brook trout and lake trout populations thrive. Splake are fertile so there is the possibility of interbreeding. The continued success of brook trout and lake trout restoration in Lake Superior may be at risk if this interbreeding occurs, causing detrimental effects on the wild populations of lake trout and brook trout. Much genetic work has been done documenting the ill effects hatchery fish have on wild populations of fish. This could be the case with splake. Considering the 30-plus year investment in lake trout recovery following the sea lamprey inva- sion, and the continued need to limit fishing for all species based on the number of lake trout available to harvest, it is prudent to investigate whether or not splake are having a negative impact. USFWS photo PAGE 5 MAZINA’IGAN WINTER 2017/2018