• GREAT LAKES/GINOOZHE • By: Hannah Panci, Kim Stone, Melonee Montano and Aaron Shultz GLIFWC Staff ClimateChangestaffareconductingaclimatechange vulnerability assessment for the 1837 and 1842 Ceded Territoriesofover60speciesofimportancetoGLIFWC’s member tribes. The assessment uses the Climate Change Vulnerability Index (CCVI) tool as well as input from regional species experts. Climate Change staff have been conducting inter- views with tribal elders and harvesters from each of the GLIFWC member tribes. A final report will integrate Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and Scientific Ecological Knowledge (SEK) to assess the vulnerability of these species to climate change. To the left, is an example of the results you can expect from this report; look for more results in future editions. If you have any comments or questions about our assessment, please contact Climate Change program coordinator Kim Stone at kstone@glifwc.org. (see Ginoozhe vulnerability, page 19) Vulnerability of ginoozhe to climate change Fall surveys track fish & contaminants in Gichigami Wild weather produces 100 mph winds By Ben Michaels GLIFWC Fisheries Biologist The crew of GLIFWC’s Great Lakes Section again braved the cold, windy weather around the Keweenaw Peninsula of Lake Superior in an effort to tag and release spawning lake trout and lake whitefish. Individual tags help researchers monitor the relative abundance and geographic movement of these two important species. Biological characteristics including length, weight, sex, age, and sea lamprey wounding rates are also collected each year during the fall assessment. This year seems to have been particularly windy with 20+ mph winds being fairly common. On October 24 wind conditions were quite fierce all across Michi- gan waters of Lake Superior. A buoy located near Munising, Mich. recorded a wind speed of 107 mph and a wave height of 28.8 feet! On that same day, Grand Traverse Bay Harbor, located near Gay was mercilessly pounded by onslaughts of massive waves, which caused stamp sands to fill back into the harbor channel, reversing all the dredge work that the Michigan Department of Natural Resources had done earlier in the fall to remove this traffic-impeding sand from the canal. Needless to say, GLIFWC’s assessment crew decided not to set nets that day. Inadditiontothefallassessmentwork,GLIFWCGreat Lakes Section continued to participate in the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Great Lakes Fish Monitoring and Surveillance Pro- gram, which was established in the 1970’s to monitor the potential presence of contaminates within body tissue of predatory fish from each of the Great Lakes. WhileGLIFWC’sassessmentcrewwentabouttheirnormalbusinessofsetting gill nets for lake trout during the fall assessment, some of those fish were retained for the EPA to analyze for the presence of contaminates, such as Polychlorinates Biphenyls(PCB’s)andPolybrominatedDiphenylEthers(PBDEs),whichcanpose human health risks. Due to Lake Superior’s size, depth, and temperature, lake trout within this Great Lake commonly have relatively low levels of these contaminates compared to the other Great Lakes. For questions or comments contact Ben Michaels at smichaels@glifwc.org. Ingredients: 1 tbsp sunflower seed oil, divided 1 each lemon, cut into 1/4” slices, divided 1 each shallot, diced, divided 1 tbsp fresh chives, minced, divided 1 tbsp fresh dill, divided 1 pound skinless, boneless northern pike fillets, divided Directions: 1. Using a 9” x 13” baking dish, layer half the oil, lemon, shallot, herbs, and filet and repeat. 2. Position the oven rack so that the fish will be 4-5” below the broiler. 3. Broil on high heat for 10-15 minutes or until fish flakes easily. Chef notes: If you are using an electric oven preheat the broiler for 5-10 minutes before broiling fish. If you are using a gas oven there is no need to preheat the oven. This recipe is great for all different types of fish. More traditional Anishinaabe recipes can be found in Mino Wiisinidaa! Let’s Eat Good! cookbook at: www.glifwc.org/publications/#Books. Original concept from biskakone, Lac du Flambeau Lemon Baked Fish MAZINA’IGAN PAGE 8 WINTER 2017/2018