Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32 Page 33 Page 34 Page 35 Page 36 Page 37 Page 38 Page 39 Page 40 Page 41 Page 42 Page 43 Page 44 Page 45 Page 46 Page 47 Page 48 Page 49 Page 50 Page 51 Page 52 Page 53 Page 54 Page 55 Page 56 Page 57 Page 58 Page 59 Page 6041 Tribal Hatcheries The majority of GLIFWC member tribes operate fish hatcheries, contributing tens- of-millions of fish into Ceded Territory waters. On average, GLIFWC tribes release more than 30 million fish a year including, walleye, muskellunge, yellow perch, lake sturgeon, and native trout species. APPENDIX IV GLIFWC Member Tribes Wisconsin oBad River: Mashkii-ziibing (place of swampy river) Reservation = 124,655 acres (73% tribal owned & trust) Tribal population = 7,886 members Treaties: 1837, 1842, 1854 72682 Maple Street • Odanah, WI 54861 • (715) 682-7111• www.badriver-nsn.gov With a climate moderated by Lake Superior, raised-bed planting grounds along the Bad River began pro- ducing crop yields long before French voyageurs entered the region. Those same explorers named the river “Bad” because of navigational challenges on the waterway known to indigenous residents as Mashkii-ziibing. Nearly 50% of the reservation is protected from timber cutting or any development activity through the 2001 Integrated Resources Management Plan. oLac Courte Oreilles: Odaawaa-zaaga’iganing (Ottawa Lake) Reservation = 75,465 acres (63% tribal owned & trust) Tribal population = 7,512 Treaties: 1837, 1842, 1854 13394 W. Trepania Road • Hayward, WI 54843 (715) 634-8934 • www.lco-nsn.gov A rich landscape of forest, wetland and water, Lac Courte Oreilles acquired its irregular shape when tribal chiefs accom- panied surveyors sent to define the exterior boundary of the reservation. The sprawling Chippewa Flowage, created under dubious circumstances by a power company in 1923, inundated the region’s most productive wild rice marshes, the Ojibwe village Post, and adjacent burial grounds. Nearly a century later, the Flowage is home to a productive fishery and miles of undeveloped shoreline. The cost of its creation, however, remains high for the community. oLac du Flambeau: Waaswaaganing (place of torch light) Reservation = 86,500 acres (61% tribal owned and trust) Tribal population = 3,491 Treaties: 1837, 1842, 1854 418 Little Pines Rd • Lac du Flambeau, WI 54538 • (715) 588-3303 • www.ldftribe.com The Lac du Flambeau reserve is located within one of the largest concentrations of freshwater lakes in the world, including 260 on-reservation lakes. The William J. Poupart Sr. Fish Hatchery is the region’s oldest (1936) and most productive facility. Hundreds of thousands of native fish species, including walleye and lake sturgeon, are stocked into on and off-reservation waters annually. oRed Cliff: Miskwaabikong (place of steep rock of red material) Reservation = 14,457 acres (60% tribal owned & trust) Tribal population = 6,638 Treaties: 1837, 1842, 1854 88385 Pike Road • Bayfield, WI 54814 • (715) 779-3700 • www.redcliff-nsn.gov Occupying the northernmost reaches of mainland Wisconsin, the Red Cliff reservation takes its name from the striking bluffs that rim the Gichigami shoreline. Ojibwe band members under the legend-