Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32 Page 33 Page 34 Page 35 Page 36 Page 37 Page 38 Page 39 Page 40 Page 41 Page 42 Page 43 Page 44 Page 45 Page 46 Page 47 Page 48 Page 49 Page 50 Page 51 Page 52 Page 53 Page 54 Page 55 Page 56 Page 57 Page 58 Page 59 Page 6042 ary Chief Buffalo, from Madeline Island, settled at Red Cliff en mass following the 1854 Treaty with the United States. Tribal commercial fishing in the Apostle Islands, which began with early European visitors, continues today. oSt. Croix: Wezaawaagami-ziibiing (yellow river) and by each community. Reservation = 4,689 acres (100% tribal owned) Tribal population = 1,089 Treaties: 1837, 1842, 1854 24663 Angeline Avenue • Webster, WI 54893 • (715) 349-2195 • www.stcciw.com Some 80 years after United States failed to reserve from public sale the land base of the St. Croix Tribe, federal authorities set aside a collective of scattered parcels that forms the core of today’s res- ervation. During that long delay, tribal members subsisted on unoccupied woodlands near the St. Croix River in northwest Wisconsin. Twenty-first century reservation property includes riparian areas and uplands. oSokaogon Mole Lake: Zaka’aaganing (place of torch-stick lake) Reservation = 4,000 acres (100% tribal owned) Tribal population = 1,465 Treaties: 1837, 1842, 1854 3051 Sand Lake Road • Crandon, WI 54520 • (715) 478-7500 • www.sokaogonchippewa.com The expected 7,600-acre reservation centered around Rice and Mole Lakes never materialized after the 1854 Treaty. Like St. Croix, the Sokaogon people spent decades labeled as a “lost tribe” until the United States established a land base on the east shore of Rice Lake. Following the successful bid to thwart the proposed Crandon Mine, Sokaogon added several thousand acres in 2003 when the band partnered with the Forest County Potawatomi Tribe to purchase former mining company woodlands. Michigan oBay Mills: Ginoozhekaaning (place of the pike) Reservation = 3,225 acres (100% tribal owned) Tribal population = 1,983 Treaty: 1836 12140 W. Lakeshore Drive • Brimley, MI 49715 • (906) 248-3241 • www.baymills.org The Bay Mills Indian Community is comprised of several historic Ojibwe bands in the far eastern Lake Superior region. Fishing on Gichigami, and the nearby waters of Lakes Huron and Michigan, continues to be a vital part of the Bay Mills Ojibwe lifeway centuries after the first net touched the water. Bay Mills is one of the founding GLIFWC member tribes and the only one in the 1836 Ceded Territory. oKeweenaw Bay: Gakiiwe’onaning (or Wiikwedong) (place at the bay) Reservation = 59,072 acres (34% tribal owned and trust) Tribal population = 3,570 Treaties: 1842, 1854 16429 Beartown Road • Baraga, MI 49908 • (906) 353-6623 • www.ojibwa.com Situated on the large bay bearing the same name, Keweenaw Bay is the largest reservation in Michigan. Westward across the base of the Keweenaw Peninsula the reservation includes a 2,406-acre wildland parcel on Lake Superior at Sleeping Bay. Missionary and linguist Frederic Baraga completed the first Ojibwe language dictionary at Keweenaw Bay in 1852.