• OJIBWEMOWIN • Down: 1. question marker 2. How or in what way? 3. those (animate) 5. Let’s all go camping. 7. Yes! Across: 4. Go out on a walk! 6. Listen! 8. Look! Behold! 9. canoe, boat IKIDOWIN ODAMINOWIN (word play) Translations: Niizh—2 A. Please, untie the canoe. I want to get in now. B. I untied the rope. I have the paddles. C. Do you want to make a tobacco offering here on the lake? Thanks. D. It is windy and there are big waves near the middle of the lake. E. Let it be, soon those fish will spawn here. F. Look! Along the shore are painted turtles. G. It is budding. Yes, there are green leaves. H. I am always happy when it is spring. Niswi—3 Down: 1. Ina 2. Aaniin 3. Ingiw 5. Gabeshidaa 7. Eyaʹ Across: 4. Babimosen 6. Bizindang 8. Inashke 9. Jiimaan Niiwin-4 1. Yesterday, did you like the wild rice? (Gi- -aan) 2. No s/he did not have it on the table there. (Od- -ziin) 3. Yes, on the table I see the soup. (Ni- -aan) 4. Yesterday, they cooked a feast. (O- -aawaa) 5. Sure! We were hungry. I am cleaning the house now. (Nim) There are various Ojibwe dialects; check for correct usage in your area. The grammar patterns may help a beginner voice inanimate and animate nouns and verbs correctly, as well as create questions and negate statements. Note that the English translation will lose its natural flow as in any world language translation. This may be reproduced for classroom use only. All other uses by author’s written permission. Some spellings and translations from The Concise Dictionary of Minnesota Ojibwe by John D. Nichols and Earl Nyholm. All inquiries can be made to MAZINA’IGAN, P.O. Box 9, Odanah, WI 54861 or email lynn@glifwc.org. © 2018 Shelly Ceglar Edited by Jennifer Ballinger, Saagajiwe-Gaabawiik Niswi—3 Double vowel system of writing Ojibwemowin. —Long vowels: AA, E, II, OO Waabooz—as in father Miigwech—as in jay Aaniin—as in seen Mooz—as in moon —Short Vowels: A, I, O Dash—as in about Ingiw—as in tin Niizho—as in only —A glottal stop is a voiceless nasal sound as in Aʹaw. —Respectfully enlist an elder for help in pronunciation and dialect differences. Gi- -aan O- -aawaa Nim- Od -ziin Ni- -aan VTI Roots are in Commands Minwendan!—Like it! Niminwendaan naboob.—I like soup. Ominwendaan naboob.—S/he likes it-soup. Jiibaakwaadan!—Cook it! Ojiibaakwaadaanaawaa naboob.— They cook (it) soup/stew. Gijiibaakwaadaan ina naboob?— Are you cooking (it) soup? Ombigamizan!—Boil it to sugar! Nindombigamizaan omaa.— I boil it to sugar here. Odombigamizaan.— S/he boils it to sugar. Niizh—2 Bezhig—1 OJIBWEMOWIN (Ojibwe Language) Niiwin—4 5 2 1 Circle the 10 underlined Ojibwe words in the letter maze. (Translations below) A N Y O M M A B O E I Z A B G ʹ N I I W A A M Z S G K A N N ʹ S N A W I G O W O A I P W E M A O K A O N A I B C A A D M I O A N M W A H A M I A P G J E Y A ʹ O M I N D A Y A A N A N O J O D J I I G I B I I G A. Daga, aabaʹan jiimaan! Niwii-pooz noongom. B. Ingii-aabaʹaan biiminakwaan. Indayaanan abwiin. C. Giwii-piindaakoojige na omaa zaaga’iganing? Miigwech. D. Noodin miinawaa mamaangaashkaa besho naawagaam. E. Maanoo, wayiiba ingiw giigoonyag wii-aamiwag omaa. F. Inashke! Jiigibiig ayaawag miskwaadesiwag. G. Zaagibagaa. Eyaʹ, ashkibagaa. H. Apane niminwendam ziigwang. 7 4 1. Bijiinaago na _____gii-minwend_____ wild rice? 2. Gaawiiin _____ayaan_____ adoopowining imaa. 3. Eyaʹ adoopowining _____waaband_____ naboob. 4. Bijiinaago _____gii-jiibaakwaad_____ wiikwandiwin! 5. Geget! Ningii-bakademin. _____biinitoon waakaʹiagan noongom. 6 VTI Questions Yes/No = na or ina is the 2nd word in the question. Who/What/Why/When-type question’s rules—to speak verbs with an initial vowel sound change and b-form suffix. Patterns for VTI: I, You, S/he, We, They Roots are commands: Clean it!—Biinitoon! Nimbiinitoon jiimaan.—I clean the boat. Gigii-piinitoon ina adoopowin?—Did you clean the table? See it!—Waabandan! Aandi waa-waabandamaan mazinaʹigan? Where will I see the book? Aaniin apii gaa-waabandaman makak? When did you see the basket? Awenen wayaabandamang mookomaan? Which one of us sees the knife? 8 Online Resources ojibwe.lib.umn.edu ojibwe.net glifwc.org 3 akiing on the earth 9 Ojibwemotaadiwag Anishinaabewakiing. They speak Ojibwe to each other in Indian Country. Gikinoo’amaadiiwigamigong, ingiw abinoojiinyag ojibwemotaadiwag. Ingiwedig giigoonyikewininiwag miinawaa giigoonyikewikwewag akwa’wewigamigong ojibwemotaadiwag. Ojibwemowag gaye giiwewaad. Ziigwang ina giwii-ojibwem? Gabeshidaa! Gidaa-maawanji’iwemin. Babimosedaa! Bizindandaa! Bizindawaadaanig! Goji-ojibwemodaa! Iskigamiziganing, gagwejindiwag. Awegonen i’iw? Awenen wa’aw? Minwendaagwad! Miigwech. Miigwech. (At the school, those children speak Ojibwe to each other. Those fishermen and fisherwomen over there in the spearfishing house speak Ojibwe to each other. They speak Ojibwe too as they go home. When it is spring, will you speak Ojibwe? Let’s camp! We could get people together. Let’s take a stroll! Let’s listen! Let’s listen to them! Let’s try to speak Ojibwe! At the sugarbush, they ask each other questions. What’s that? Who is this? It is fun! Thank you.) MAZINA’IGAN PAGE 16 SPRING 2018