• MINING/CWD • By Travis Bartnick, GLIFWC Wildlife Biologist Chronicwastingdisease(CWD)hasonceagainbeendetectedintheWisconsin Ceded Territory. On January 22, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) confirmed that a wild deer tested positive for CWD in northeast Lincoln County. This is the first detection of CWD in a wild deer in Lincoln County, and the second CWD positive wild deer detected in theWisconsin portion of the Ceded Territory. The only other CWD positive deer detected in the Wisconsin portion of the Ceded Territory was found in Washburn County in 2012. This most recent CWD detection will result in baiting and feeding bans for state hunters in Lincoln and Langlade counties, and a renewal of the baiting and feeding ban in Oneida County. The deer that tested positive for CWD in Lincoln County was reported to be a healthy looking two-year old buck and was harvested near the Wisconsin River, a few miles south of Rhinelander. The location where the deer was harvested is about 20 miles from Three Lakes the nearest captive cervid facility with a CWD positive deer. The Wisconsin DNR is currently planning to sample additional deer in the surrounding area, which will likely result in the issuance of emergency disease response tags in an effort to determine the potential prevalence of the disease on the landscape. In other CWD news, a February press release confirmed that a CWD positive deer discovered on a captive deer facility in Waupaca County in 2017 was sourced from a captive deer farm in Pennsylvania. Another deer on the Pennsylvania farm also tested positive for CWD. This is likely the first confirmed documentation of the transportation of CWD positive deer across state lines by the captive deer industry. The transport of a CWD positive deer from Pennsylvania to Wisconsin is another illustration of how easily this disease can be moved long distances and continues to threaten the future of deer hunting and treaty resources across the Ceded Territory. Free range buck tests CWD positive in Wisconsin CT Deer farm trade keeps always-fatal disease moving Wakefield, Mich.—A half-mile long section of snowmobile trail in Gogebic County has been leveled and stabilized after last spring’s exploratory mineral drilling by Highland Copper Company. The work follows an early April2017drillingoperationthatturned the trail into a muddy, deeply-rutted channel. The trail and adjacent County Road 519 occupy a 466-foot wide, north-south strip of Gogebic County Road Commission land that bisects the westernendofthePorcupineMountains Wilderness State Park (the Porkies). Contractors for Highland, which owns land next to the western end of the Porkies,originallybegandrillingwithin a one square mile section of state land (T49N,R45W,Section5)insidethepark in early February 2017. Michigan law allowssubsurfacemineralrightsowners the right to “reasonable” use of the sur- face to access minerals. A conservation agreement with the Michigan Depart- ment of Natural Resources resulted in minimal damage to the surface, and the company suspended operations within the park in late February due to unsea- sonably warm weather. A few weeks later, however, the company resumed drilling on the strip of county land along the road, where no such agreement existed. By early April, heavy equipment had torn up the trail. Frequent spring rains added to the problem, sending muddy runoff south into a Gypsy Creek tributary, and north into the Presque Isle River valley. A citizenactiongroup,theUpperPeninsula Environmental Coalition, alerted the MichiganDepartmentofEnvironmental Quality(DEQ)andthemedia.TheDEQ suspended the drilling the next day, ordered Highland to restore the site, and issueda$25,000fineforfailuretoobtain the required wetland, soil erosion, and sediment control permits. Highland plans to finish drilling three holes along the road that weren’t completed last spring, and to drill three moreholeswithinthepark.Theyalready haveaminingpermitforanunderground mineoutsidethepark,acquiredwiththeir purchaseofOrvanaResourcesin2014.If Highlanddecidestomineunderthepark, it plans to access that underground area fromitslandsborderingSection5.Prior tobeginningminingactivities,Highland would need to file an amended permit request with DEQ. And before poten- tial approval, the DEQ would provide opportunityforpubliccomment,includ- ing comments from any interested Tribes. —GLIFWC Staff Exploratory drilling set to resume in western Upper Michigan Damage from 2017 yields $25,000 fine for mining co. Location of 2017 and planned winter 2018 drill sites. (Map courtesy of the Michigan DNR.) Evenwiththisopportunityin2017, totalharvestofnorthernpikewas28,442 pounds.Forthe2018springfishingsea- son,tribalmemberscanharvestnorthern pike by spearing or netting. Figure 1. Stock biomass estimated by the surplus production base model of northern pike in Mille Lacs Lake. Ginoozhe (continued from page 1) The wolf hide is in the process of being tanned. Soon it will be in the hands of the Wolf Clan family, generating positive energy and healing for people in need. “I share all these things because I hope people will look at wolves and other animalsdifferently,”Cloudsaid.“Peopledon’trealizewhatananimalgoesthrough when it gives up the hide. Things need to be done for them. And now this wolf will be at rest and able to help some people that are really in need.” (continued from page 2) Ma’iingan MAZINA’IGAN PAGE 4 SPRING 2018