• ENFORCEMENT • Aquaticinvasivespecies(AIS)canhavenegativeimpactstotreatyresources including spawning and fish habitats. Remember when out on the waters to take the precautions to prevent their spread. Watch for invasives hitching rides on plant fragments, mud or debris! Stop Aquatic Invasives ü REMOVEanymudordebris,plantsandanimalsfromyourboat,trailer and equipment ü DRAIN all water from boat, fishing boxes and equipment ensuring it does not drain back into the waterbody. ü CLEAN or DRY boat, trailer and all equipment that came into contact with water including nets, buoys, anchors, ropes and lines, etc. Don’t forget to check these spots for hitchhikers. Ganawendan Ginibiiminaan (Protect Our Waters) Ready to sled, hunt & more An interagency team of law enforcement officers recently trained students from three Upper Michigan school districts in a snowmobile safety class. GLIFWC Officers Steven Amsler and Matt Kniskern said the February 20-23 event included 6th graders from Watersmeet, Ontonagon, and Ewen-Trout Creek Middle Schools. A total of 46 kids participated in the course and received their safety certificates. The students are scheduled to move on to ATV safety in March and then Hunters Safety in April. Students completing all the classes will then be able to go to Camp Nesbit for a week in early May. This camp and associated safety program relies heavily on cooperating agencies to be successful including, Ontonagon Sheriff’s Office, Michigan Department of Natural Resources, Porcupine Mountain State Park Rangers, and community volunteers. (S. Amsler photo) Enforcement Division trains in cold water rescue In between anglers and ice- house jiggers (background) out on Chequamegon Bay, GLIFWC officers wearing bright yellow cold water rescue suits practice entering and climbing out of the water onto the ice sheet. (CO Rasmussen photos) Armed with a rope fitted with a carabiner, a GLIFWC warden moves in to retrieve a fellow officer from the icy waters of Lake Superior. The Enforcement Division conducts a training refresher each year in preparation for potential rescue situations on Gichigami or inland waters. Ogaawag for elders returning in 2018 to LCO After a strong turnout last season, Lac Courte Oreilles area GLIFWC wardens plan to collect fresh-speared walleyes again this spring for distribution to com- munity elders. Officer Mike Popovich and LCO fisherman Jim Tate originally hatched the plan before the 2017 spring spearing opener, placing donation bins at boat landings where tribal members have their catch counted and measured by GLIFWC creel teams. LCO spearers responded with a strong 168-fish donation and Officer Pat Ratzleff filleted the entire catch. Tate, Popovich, and Ratzleff then spent a day hand delivering frozen walleye packages to elders and disabled tribal members throughout the Lac Courte Oreilles area. “The harvesters, the people that donated, really enjoyed having the oppor- tunity to share with others,” Popovich said. “We fed a lot of people in need, a lot of families.” For elders and harvesters that can attend, Popovich is planning an event at the LCO Conservation Office after the season wraps up in May. Povovich said it’s a great way to build relationships and a sense of community. “We’d like to see everyone come together, meet each other and spend a little time reflecting on spearfishing,” Popovich said. For those that cannot make the event, GLIFWC officers and volunteers plan on delivering fish once again this year. Contact Dolly at LCO Conservation 715.634.0102 or Officer Mike Popovich at 715.292.7535 for more information. —CO Rasmussen Look for donation bins at boat landings open to LCO tribal spearers. (COR) MAZINA’IGAN PAGE 6 SPRING 2018