• ISHPAAGOONIKAA • Ishpaagoonikaa Deep Snow Camp at Lac Courte Oreilles GLIFWC camp shines as positive youth mentoring experience The Ishpaagoonikaa Deep Snow Camp family 2018. (P. Maday photo) By Paula Maday, Staff Writer Campers use safe knife cutting techniques to chop potatoes, carrots, and onions for venison stew. Meal in a jar (inset). Each participant got to take home a jar of pressure- cooked, ready-to-eat venison stew to enjoy with their families. (P. Maday photos) Sokaogon Mole Lake staff, volunteers and GLIFWC wardens prepare a spearing hole to teach youth how to spear through the ice on Pelican Lake. (D. Jennings photo) Greg Biskakone Johnson teaches about the significance of hides at a moccasin workshop at the 2018 Bad River Bibooni-Gabeshiwin. (D. Jennings photo) (See Deep Snow Camp, page 18) Lac Courte Oreilles, Wis.—It was a cold weekend January 26-28 as 47 youth came together on the Lac Courte Oreilles reservation for Ishpaagoonikaa Deep Snow Camp. For many of these youth, it was a reunion, a chance to see their camp family during the long, cold winter season. For others, it was a welcome, a matriculation into a special group and learning environment where Ojibwe tradi- tions abound each biboon. In the camp family, everyone has a role: youth, elders, tribal leaders, com- munity members, culture bearers, and GLIFWC staff. Wardens from the Conser- vation Enforcement Division play a huge role in organizing and leading activities throughout the camp. “The wardens believe in the native communities they serve, and they work hard to foster healthy and respectful relationships between community members and their environment,” says GLIFWC Outreach Officer Heather Bliss. “Anytime we get an opportunity to lead or participate in an outreach program, such as the winter camp, the wardens are the first ones to commit to leading workshops or assisting cultural advisors and elders.” Mike Burns, a western district warden who works in the Mille Lacs area, says that he enjoys helping out with the GLIFWC seasonal camps. “To see the kids’ excitement and ability to absorb what we instruct them on is amazing. It makes me feelcomfortablewiththemgoingoutdoors,doingtheseactivities,andstayingsafe.” Burns led a session on Saturday morning on Grindstone Lake, where he instructed youth in setting tip-ups, alongside fellow warden Gale Smith and Lac Vieux Desert harvester Roger LaBine. “We showed them how to set both tradi- tional and modern tip-ups,” he said. “We explained the parts of the tip-up, and how and where to set them in the water column based on the species they’re fishing for. There’s many ways to do the same task and stay true to the harvest activity.” For campers, seeing a traditional Ojibwe method of ice fishing alongside a more modern method shows that while the ways of harvesting may have changed, the intent is still the same, and doesn’t impinge on the treaty rights of Ojibwe tribes. Burns helped facilitate two other sessions during the camp, one on winter survival and one on snow shelter building, along with Lauren Tuori, a GLIFWC conservation officer working near Lac Courte Oreilles. Tuori is active in local schools and educational programs year-round, in an effort to build positive rela- tionships between harvesters and wardens. During the opening ceremony, Tuori asked campers two questions. “How many of you have met me before, either out in the woods, on a lake, in school, or at camp?” she asked. About 3/4 of the kids in attendance raised their hands. She then asked, “How many of you have met me because I was writing a ticket to you or someone you know?” No one raised their hand. “I told the students that is how we measure success in the enforcement division at GLIFWC. My goal is to help teach kids to hunt, fish, and gather ethically, responsibly, and legally. I want kids and parents alike to feel free to call me at any time with questions about laws and regulations, because our mission is to encourage tribal members to exercise their treaty rights while protecting the natural resources.” Ishpaagoonikaa Deep Snow Camp travels to a different tribal community every year, offering GLIFWC member tribes the opportunity to encourage inter- tribal, intergenerational mentorships between youth and harvesters throughout the CededTerritory.InLCO,thiswasnodifferent.Theweekendincludedastorytelling session with Mike and Fred Tribble—the LCO ogichidaag that helped launch the LCO v. Wisconsin case in 1983—as well as time spent ice fishing with new Voigt Intertribal Task Force Chairman Jason Schlender. The storytelling session has become somewhat of a camp tradition the past few years, a sort of rite of passage. It bonds everyone at camp through the sharing of an origin story—the story behind the LCO case that led to the formation of GLIFWC. This story is part of all of us—the reason why we are all gathered here now, at camp, and the reason we are able to continue learning how to exercise our treaty rights. So it is no surprise to see 40-some squirrely middle schoolers sitting PAGE 9 MAZINA’IGAN SPRING 2018